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"The Special Educational Needs Coordinator works closely with external agencies and has positive working relationships with parents.  These collaborations are highly successful in making sure that pupils receive the right support. As a result, these pupils' needs are met."  Ofsted 2017

                     

                         Annual report for SEN/D 2016-17

“Pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities make consistently strong progress because staff ensure work is set at the right level for them. The extra support pupils receive from teachers and teaching assistants provides the guidance they need to develop their skills in reading, writing and mathematics.”

OfSTED May 2017

Policy

The SEN/D policy was last reviewed in December 2015 and will be reviewed again December 2017.

The SENCo is Mrs Deborah Stiles and the SEN/D Governor was Mr Dave Russell until July 2017. Dave met regularly with the SENCo throughout the academic year.

Number of pupils on the SEN/D register averaged 21 throughout the year (some fluctuations due to pupil movement).

We had no statements or Education Health and Care plans. At times throughout the year there were 3 children with hearing impairments

Average Points Progress of pupils with SEN/D compared to non SEN/D  at Peatmoor Primary School

Reading:

Year group

NON SEN/D

SEN/D

1

4.9

4.3

2

6.1

6.7

3

6.1

6.3

4

6

7

5

6.2

5

6

6.7

7

 

Writing:

Year group

NON SNE/D

SEN/D

1

4.8

4.3

2

6.4

7.3

3

5.9

6

4

6.2

6.3

5

6.3

4.3

6

7.2

8

 

Maths:

Year group

NON SEN/D

SEN/D

1

5.3

5.7

2

6.3

6.7

3

6.3

6.2

4

6.2

6.3

5

5.8

4.5

6

7.2

7

 

As you can see the vast majority of cases our SEN/D pupils made the same progress as our non-SEN/D pupils and in lots of year groups the SEN/D progress was enhanced and exceeded the non-SEN/D progress. As a result, diminishing the differences between these two groups of pupils.

During the academic year, Ofsted (as a body) recognised that SEND children are unlikely to meet the same level of achievement as their peers.  Therefore, progress is the indicator that is now concentrated on. At Peatmoor, 87% of SEND children made 5 steps or more progress during the academic year 2016-17.

“As a result of the targeted support they receive, most disadvantaged pupils and pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities make swift progress…

…Progress for disadvantaged pupils and pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities is rising rapidly.”

OfSTED May 2017

 

SEN/D attendance

SEN/D attendance – 95.15% (Non-SEND 96.65%) This figure has increased from last year.

SEN/D Authorised absence – 4.46% (Non-SEND 2.81%)

SEN/D Unauthorised absence - 0.39% (Non-SEND 0.54%) This figure has halved since last year.

 

Staffing

Each class had a teaching assistant (TA) allocated to them based on the need of the children within the class. Classes that had least allocation had less need compared to other classed within the school.

The allocation of the teaching assistants was changed throughout the year based on school data to ensure this resource was appropriately placed to support the children that most needed it.

Teaching assistants attended courses as appropriate to their own needs and the children that they were working with. These included:

  • 1 x Higher Level Teaching Assistant (HLTA) attending a specific ‘Catch Up Programme’ refresher course to support Maths within the school.
  • All TAs received training on understanding the school data and methods to ‘close the gap’.
  • SENCo attended SEN/D updates
  • Autism awareness
  • Dyslexia awareness updates
  • Individual support from SENCo to support TAs with individual pupil needs

 

Teaching assistants were used during afternoon sessions to boost individual year groups that needed this support.

Teaching assistants were trained to do ‘paired reading’ with individual readers. We also had a parent helper in term 6 who came into support paired reading across the school. This had an impact on the children’s reading ages. In some cases, the reading ages increased by over 14 months in a 9 month time period.

“Leadership of the provision for pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities is strong. Leaders place high importance on including all pupils. Additional funding is used well to develop well-targeted provision. Focused training improves the knowledge and skills of teachers and teaching assistants.”

OfSTED May 2017

 

Outside Agencies

Some of the children were seen by outside agencies. These agencies included:

  • The Educational Psychologist
  •  The Advisory Teacher for Hearing Impaired Children
  • Saltway Centre Assessment Team
  • Targetted Mental Health In School (TaMHS)
  • Speech and Language therapist

“The special educational needs coordinator works closely with external agencies and has positive working relationships with parents. These collaborations are highly successful in making sure that pupils receive the right support. As a result, these pupils’ needs are met.”

OFSTED May 2017

Parental Involvement

Parents received reports from these agencies and the opportunity to discuss this further with SENCo. When the Educational Psychologist was involved, the parents of the child are invited to attend a Joint Problem Solving Meeting where targets are set and agreed upon. This is then reviewed at a later date.

Parents all receive a copy of their child’s Provision Plan 3 times a year (and the reviewed one as appropriate). Parents are invited into school to sign these and discuss the new targets with the class teacher. If a parent chooses not to attend these meetings, then the Plan is sent home for signing.

Pupil Involvement

All pupils are aware of their targets and their provision plan is shared with them. Key words and phonics that the child is working on are attached to literacy books to support their learning. The work that the children produce independently in class, is marked against their provision plan target where appropriate, to ensure that support work is transferred into their general learning.

All children on the SEN/D register completed a ‘Hopes and Wishes’ sheet at the beginning of the year. This was to encourage each pupil to have their own hopes and aspirations within the classroom and beyond. These ‘hopes’ were marked off as they were achieved and most of the children reached these by the end of the year. This is being repeated this academic year for the third year.